Prison Ministries Testimony: Impacting Lives

Terry Hamrick was serving time for drug related felonies in the Texas Criminal Justice (TDJC) system, when he found God and The Salvation Army. This is his story.

Terry’s battle with drugs began while in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam era. After being court marshaled for using and distributing narcotics, he was sentenced to Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado for rehabilitation.

Discharged, he came home to his native Texas where he began to use and sell drugs once again. He sold marijuana for 10 years and slowly began to delve in to the world of cocaine, which ultimately cost him his marriage. He got involved with strippers and methamphetamines. Hamrick recalls, “I was looking for love in all the wrong places.” During the late 80s, he began to use and distribute “party drugs” i.e. cocaine, speed and Rohypnol (date rape drug). He was arrested in 1991 for cocaine and marijuana and again in 1995, for which he received five felony drug counts. He was convicted and sentenced to seven concurrent 20-years sentences.

While in prison, he dedicated his life to God through Tarrant County’s GODPOD (prison Bible study). In 1996, he was transferred to the TDJC system where he met some inmates involved in The Salvation Army’s Bible study and began attending meetings.

“The Salvation Army’s Bible Study profoundly changed my life. It brought me from being a baby Christian to a more mature Christian,” Hamrick said, “The Salvation Army offered a divine understanding to my addiction.” Over the next six and a half years, he completed the entire curriculum and continued to help others grow in their faith. “I got a hunger for Christ!”

“Through God, The Salvation Army and the prison drug programs, I have been completely rehabilitated,” Hamrick exclaimed. After two and a half years of freedom, he has committed himself to give back to those still behind bars and to show them that through diligent Bible study and devoted commitment to God, freedom can be found from any addiction.

Terry now resides in Arlington, Texas, where he works as a carpenter.

Back